IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 712: Languages and Literacy in the Early Medieval West, III: Germanic Vernaculars in Continental Charters

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Project 'The Languages of Early Medieval Charters', Universidad del País Vasco
Organisers:Edward Roberts, Department of History, University of Liverpool / Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco
Francesca Tinti, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Vitoria-Gasteiz
Moderator/Chair:Stefan Esders, Geschichte der Spätantike und des frühen Mittelalters, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Paper 712-aTraces of Bilingualism in Early Medieval Northern Italy: The Evidence from Private Charters, 8th-10th Centuries
(Language: English)
Marco Stoffella, Dipartimento Culture e Civiltà, Università degli studi di Verona
Marco Stoffella, Dipartimento Culture e Civiltà, Università degli studi di Verona
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Language and Literature - German, Literacy and Orality, Social History
Paper 712-bThe Use of the Vernacular in Fulda and Freising Charters, c. 770 - c. 900
(Language: English)
Edward Roberts, Department of History, University of Liverpool / Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco
Edward Roberts, Department of History, University of Liverpool / Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Language and Literature - German, Literacy and Orality, Social History
Paper 712-cGermanic Names in Latin Charters: Reflections on the Saint-Gall Charters
(Language: English)
Hans-Werner Goetz, Historisches Seminar, Universität Hamburg
Hans-Werner Goetz, Historisches Seminar, Universität Hamburg
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Language and Literature - German, Literacy and Orality, Social History
Abstract

In the Anglo-Saxon and eastern Frankish worlds, Latin was not the language of everyday speech; it needed to be learned as a second or foreign language. Multilingual and vernacular texts from these regions thus enable us to pose questions about literacy, the relationship between written and oral communication, language choice, and code-switching. The papers in this third session all explore the interplay between Latin and the vernacular in charters from Carolingian and Ottonian Europe, concentrating on ecclesiastical archives in Northern Italy, the cartularies of Fulda and Freising, and the rich charter collection of St Gall.