IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 719: Eating and Being Eaten by God, II: England and the Low Countries

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Mystical Theology Network (MTN) / Instituut voor de Studie van Spiritualiteit, KU Leuven
Organiser:Louise Nelstrop, St Benet's Hall, University of Oxford / Sarum College, Salisbury
Moderator/Chair:Rob Faesen, Institute for the Study of Spirituality, KU Leuven / Ruusbroecgenootschap, Universiteit Antwerpen
Paper 719-aGertrud of Helfta's Use of the Thirst Metaphor from Psalms 42 and 63 to Articulate Her Longing for God and Absorption into Christ
(Language: English)
Regine Slavin, Sarum College, Salisbury
Regine Slavin, Sarum College, Salisbury
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Liturgy, Monasticism, Religious Life
Paper 719-bRichard Rolle on Eating, Satiation, and Nourishing Others
(Language: English)
Louise Nelstrop, St Benet's Hall, University of Oxford / Sarum College, Salisbury
Louise Nelstrop, St Benet's Hall, University of Oxford / Sarum College, Salisbury
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Religious Life, Theology
Paper 719-cHaving Your Christ and Eating Him Too: Mutual Devouring and Agency in Hadewijch of Brabant and Julian of Norwich
(Language: English)
Godelinde Gertrude Perk, Institutionen för språkstudier, Umeå Universitet
Godelinde Gertrude Perk, Institutionen för språkstudier, Umeå Universitet
Index terms: Language and Literature - Dutch, Language and Literature - Middle English, Theology, Women's Studies
Abstract

This session examines ways in which mystics relate to food. The first paper examines starvation and the relationship between contemplation and fasting in Bede and Felix on eremiticism. The second paper explores the importance of eating well and satiation in Richard Rolle’s mysticism and as a prerequisite for nourishing others. The third paper examines ways in which mystics and God engage in mutual consumption, focusing on the thought of Julian of Norwich and Hadewijch of Brabant it explores how this relates to everyday life and food, as well as medieval medical theories and Eucharistic practise.