IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 720: Constructing Identities, Then and Now: Ethnicity, Nation, and Empire in the Early to High Middle Ages

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Eric Wolever, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Moderator/Chair:Harry Munt, Department of History, University of York
Paper 720-aGildas and Giddens: Structuration Theory, Anglo-Saxon Archaeology, and Contemporary Cultural Politics
(Language: English)
James Michael Harland, Department of Arts, Design & Social Sciences, Northumbria University
James Michael Harland, Department of Arts, Design & Social Sciences, Northumbria University
James Michael Harland, Department of Arts, Design & Social Sciences, Northumbria University
Index terms: Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Political Thought
Paper 720-bSpatializing History: The Cardinal Points and the Location of Empire in the 12th Century
(Language: English)
Eric Wolever, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Eric Wolever, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Eric Wolever, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 720-cApocalypse Now: A Man and His Horse
(Language: English)
Heidi Stoner, Department of History of Art, University of York
Heidi Stoner, Department of History of Art, University of York
Heidi Stoner, Department of History of Art, University of York
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Art History - Sculpture
Abstract

This panel will evaluate the bases on which collective identities were constructed in the early to high Middle Ages, broadly construed. Harland’s paper will interrogate the use of political and sociological theory applied to archaeology in the historiographical construction of ethnic identity. Wolever’s will look at the use of geographical categories in the construction of historical empires in the 12th century. Stoner’s will examine the use of Apocalypse imagery in the construction of kingship in regional identity. It will approach these questions from an interdisciplinary perspective, remaining attentive to the relationship of the medieval and the modern in this process.