IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 726: Are the Middle Ages Relevant?: Perspectives, I

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Mediävistenverband
Organiser:Klaus P. Oschema, Historisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Moderator/Chair:Steffen Patzold, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Paper 726-aCrossing Cultural Boundaries or the Embodiment of Colonialism?: Teaching the Middle Ages in New Zealand
(Language: English)
Chris Jones, Department of History, University of Canterbury, Christchurch
Chris Jones, Department of History, University of Canterbury, Christchurch
Chris Jones, Department of History, University of Canterbury, Christchurch
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Teaching the Middle Ages
Paper 726-bMaking it Matter: Audiences, Relevance, and Access at the Tower of London
(Language: English)
Sally Dixon-Smith, Tower of London, Historic Royal Palaces
Sally Dixon-Smith, Tower of London, Historic Royal Palaces
Sally Dixon-Smith, Tower of London, Historic Royal Palaces
Index terms: Architecture - Secular, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Social History, Teaching the Middle Ages
Paper 726-cGoing Popular: How Charlemagne Might Still Become a European
(Language: English)
Klaus P. Oschema, Historisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Klaus P. Oschema, Historisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Klaus P. Oschema, Historisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Index terms: Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Teaching the Middle Ages
Abstract

These two sessions and a related round table are intended to offer a wide-ranging exploration of the relevance of the study of medieval history for modern society. They aim to consider this relevance from a variety of perspectives, moving beyond traditional tendencies to root the importance of medieval history in the explanations it provides for the origins of political institutions, to consider questions of broader social, cultural, economic, and artistic significance. In exploring perspectives from France, Germany, UK, and Australasia, participants will seek to move beyond traditional Eurocentric boundaries and debate the case for the discipline’s global importance.