IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 735: Words across a Corrupting Sea, I: New Directions in the Study of Translation in the Medieval Mediterranean

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Spain-North Africa Project (SNAP)
Organiser:Anthony Minnema, Howard College, Samford University
Moderator/Chair:Alexander Fidora, Departament de Ciències de l'Antiguitat i de l'Edat Mitjana, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Paper 735-aThe Genesis of the Medical Works of Constantine the African and Their Circulation in the Long 12th Century
(Language: English)
Monica Green, Department of History, Arizona State University
Monica Green, Department of History, Arizona State University
Monica Green, Department of History, Arizona State University
Index terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies, Language and Literature - Greek, Medicine
Paper 735-bHebrew-into-Latin: The Latin Translation of Maimonides's Guide and its Cultural Context
(Language: English)
Diana Di Segni, Thomas-Institut, Universität zu Köln
Diana Di Segni, Thomas-Institut, Universität zu Köln
Diana Di Segni, Thomas-Institut, Universität zu Köln
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Language and Literature - Latin, Philosophy
Paper 735-cToward a New Edition of the Latin Translation of al-Ghazali's Maqasid al-Falasifa
(Language: English)
Anthony Minnema, Howard College, Samford University
Anthony Minnema, Howard College, Samford University
Anthony Minnema, Howard College, Samford University
Index terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies, Language and Literature - Latin, Philosophy
Abstract

The translations of the medieval Mediterranean crossed a range of boundaries. Texts not only changed from one language to another, but also crossed political, cultural, and social borders to find new audiences. These two sessions highlight new ways in which scholars are examining Mediterranean translations and their ability to cross frontiers. Many languages are represented in the papers, including Arabic, Greek, Latin, Hebrew, and Romance. Keeping with the congress theme, several papers treat translations of medical texts, while others discuss a range of genres from philosophy to peace treaties, as well as the debate to render sense-for-sense or word-for-word.