IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 736: How to Perceive of Piracy and Maritime Violence in Late Medieval Europe, I

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Thomas Heebøll-Holm, Institut for Historie, Syddansk Universitet, Odense
Gregor Rohmann, Historisches Seminar, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Moderator/Chair:Georg Christ, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
Paper 736-aA Farewell to Piracy: The 'Hanse', the 'Vitalian Brethren', and Maritime Violence in the Baltic around 1400
(Language: English)
Gregor Rohmann, Historisches Seminar, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Gregor Rohmann, Historisches Seminar, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Index terms: Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban, Law, Maritime and Naval Studies
Paper 736-bMerchant Pirates? Pirate Traders?: Violent Seizure as Part of Merchants's Conflict Regulation in the Baltic Sea and North Sea, 1370-1430
(Language: English)
Philipp Höhn, Sonderforschungsbereich 1095 'Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Philipp Höhn, Sonderforschungsbereich 1095 'Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Index terms: Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban, Law, Maritime and Naval Studies
Paper 736-cThe Ruler and the Pirate: Accepting and Denying Political Responsibility for the Actions of the ruyteren ter zee in Northern Europe in the 16th Century
(Language: English)
Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz, Amsterdam School of Historical Studies, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz, Amsterdam School of Historical Studies, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Index terms: Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban, Law, Maritime and Naval Studies
Abstract

Modern historiography usually claims that medieval trade was constantly threatened by pirates and that piracy was endemic in medieval Europe. The sessions ‘How to Perceive of Piracy and Maritime Violence in Late Medieval Europe’ I & II aim at challenging this assumption. By bringing together specialists in medieval maritime history from Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United States, we seek to investigate the role of merchants and mariners as both victims and agents of violence at sea, as well as that of public authorities and institutions in the curbing or encouragement of maritime predatory activity. Thus these sessions seek to shed new light on the grey area between war, trade, and crime.