IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 803: Digitising Patterns of Power, IV: Reconstructing Historical Landscapes - Conceptualization, Mapping, and Geocommunication

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Institut für Geographie und Regionalforschung, Universität Wien
Organisers:Karel Kriz, Institut für Geographie und Regionalforschung, Universität Wien
Alexander Pucher, Institut für Geographie und Regionalforschung, Universität Wien
Moderator/Chair:Stefan Eichert, Institut für Urgeschichte und Historische Archäologie, Universität Wien / Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 803-aRelational Modeling of Historical Data: A Technical Perspective
(Language: English)
Christof Rauchenberger, Independent Scholar, Wien
Alexander Watzinger, Craws, Wien /Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Geography and Settlement Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 803-bBeyond the Google Map Marker: Visualizing Space and Time in a Historical Context
(Language: English)
Alexander Pucher, Institut für Geographie und Regionalforschung, Universität Wien
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Geography and Settlement Studies
Paper 803-cCartographic Representation of Spatial and Temporal Uncertainty of Historical Data
(Language: English)
Markus Breier, Institut für Geographie und Regionalforschung, Universität Wien
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Geography and Settlement Studies
Abstract

Patterns of power exist in space and time. To visualise and explore spaces, places and spatial relations, methods of geocommunication and geographical information science will be used in the project ‘Digitising Patterns of Power’ (DPP). Geographical Information Science (GISc), Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and their tools of spatial analysis – e.g. spatial statistics, network analyses, least cost calculations and view shed analyses – are digital methods to gain insight into historical geographies. These digital methods are applied to the research questions of the historians and archaeologists of the project, resulting in an interdisciplinary ‘digital humanities’ approach.