IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 806: Organising Daily Life: Benedictine Monasticism between Ideal and Practice, 11th - 13th Centuries

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Sonderforschungsbereich 1070 'RessourcenKulturen', Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen
Organisers:Marco Krätschmer, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Petra Lang, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Moderator/Chair:Steffen Patzold, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Paper 806-aEating and Drinking in the Monastic Community of Hirsau: Benedictine Monasticism between Asceticism and Physical Needs
(Language: English)
Petra Lang, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Petra Lang, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Index terms: Daily Life, Monasticism, Religious Life
Paper 806-bSpirituality and Economy: A Permanent Challenge to Abbatial Leadership
(Language: English)
Marco Krätschmer, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Marco Krätschmer, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Index terms: Economics - General, Monasticism, Religious Life
Paper 806-cBenedictine Monasticism and the Papacy: A Bottom-Up Perspective from the Low Countries
(Language: English)
Johan Belaen, Vakgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit Gent
Johan Belaen, Vakgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit Gent
Index terms: Canon Law, Mentalities, Monasticism, Religious Life
Abstract

The first paper examines the role and the importance of eating and drinking in the monastic community of Hirsau and deals with the tensions between asceticism and physical needs based both on normative and narrative sources. It also provides a comparative analysis of eating and drinking in other benedictine monasteries. The second paper considers the responsibilty of abbatial leadership to treat the discrepancy between spirituality and economy. The abbot’s virtue of discretio ensures the daily needs while also providing for the ascetic contemplation of his community. The third paper explores the role of the black monks in the creation of the Benedictine Order by taking in account a wide range of sources, such as sermons, charters, and chronicles. This approach aims at adjusting the present-day top-down perspective which regards the Order primarily as failed papal reform.