IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 812: Languages and Literacy in the Early Medieval West, IV: Language and Power in Anglo-Saxon Charters

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Project 'The Languages of Early Medieval Charters', Universidad del País Vasco
Organisers:Edward Roberts, Department of History, University of Liverpool / Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco
Francesca Tinti, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Vitoria-Gasteiz
Moderator/Chair:Levi Roach, Department of History, University of Exeter
Paper 812-aConstructing Authority in Anglo-Saxon 'Private' Charters
(Language: English)
Robert Gallagher, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco
Robert Gallagher, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Language and Literature - Old English, Literacy and Orality, Social History
Paper 812-bThe Linguistic Features and Formulae of Anglo-Saxon Writs
(Language: English)
Albert Fenton, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Albert Fenton, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Language and Literature - Old English, Literacy and Orality, Social History
Paper 812-cLanguages of Boundaries and Boundaries of Language in Cornish Charters, 900-1100
(Language: English)
Charles Insley, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
Charles Insley, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Language and Literature - Old English, Literacy and Orality, Social History
Abstract

In the Anglo-Saxon and eastern Frankish worlds, Latin was not the language of everyday speech; it needed to be learned as a second or foreign language. Multilingual and vernacular texts from these regions thus enable us to pose questions about literacy, the relationship between written and oral communication, language choice, and code-switching. The papers in this fourth session all explore the interplay between Latin and the vernacular in charters from Anglo-Saxon England, examining linguistic choice as a source of authority, the significance of the language of late Anglo-Saxon writs, and the implications of the appearance of Old Cornish in charters from Cornwall.