IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 813: Perspectives on Medieval Diet, IV: Archaeological Approaches to Medieval Foodways and Identity

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Medieval Diet Group
Organiser:Chris Woolgar, Department of History / Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Culture, University of Southampton
Moderator/Chair:Gundula Müldner, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading
Paper 813-aSocial Status as Expressed through Food in Medieval England: Castles, Manor Houses, and the Zooarchaeological Evidence
(Language: English)
Umberto Albarella, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield
Umberto Albarella, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield
Umberto Albarella, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Archaeology - Sites, Daily Life, Social History
Paper 813-bThe Foodways of Religious Women: An Integrated Isotope Perspective
(Language: English)
Charlotte Scull, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading
Charlotte Scull, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading
Charlotte Scull, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Archaeology - Sites, Daily Life, Social History
Paper 813-cTapping the Message of the Mobile patellae: Organic Residue Analysis and Two Southern English Pottery Traditions
(Language: English)
Maureen Mellor, Department for Continuing Education, University of Oxford
Maureen Mellor, Department for Continuing Education, University of Oxford
Maureen Mellor, Department for Continuing Education, University of Oxford
Lucy Cramp, Department of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of Bristol
Lucy Cramp, Department of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of Bristol
Lucy Cramp, Department of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of Bristol
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Architecture - General, Daily Life, Social History
Abstract

Food and foodways are an important means of expressing personal and group identities. This session brings together three papers which use different archaeological methods in order to explore diet and foodways of different groups in medieval society, aristocratic households (Albarella), monastic communities, specifically religious women (Scull) and rural populations (dairy farmers?) (Mellor and Cramp). We showcase recent methodological developments to a non-specialist audience and explore how archaeology can provide new perspectives on past lives which complement and enhance evidence from documentary sources.