IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 819: Eating and Being Eaten by God, III: Major Theologians, Philosophers, and Theological Ideas

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Mystical Theology Network (MTN) / Instituut voor de Studie van Spiritualiteit, KU Leuven
Organiser:Louise Nelstrop, St Benet's Hall, University of Oxford / Sarum College, Salisbury
Moderator/Chair:John Arblaster, Institute for the Study of Spirituality, KU Leuven / Ruusbroecgenootschap, Universiteit Antwerpen
Paper 819-aIt’s Complicated: Margery Kempe’s Relationship with the Eucharist
(Language: English)
Einat Klafter, Foundation for Interreligious & Intercultural Research & Dialogue, Université de Genève
Einat Klafter, Foundation for Interreligious & Intercultural Research & Dialogue, Université de Genève
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Lay Piety, Religious Life
Paper 819-bHadewijch and the Most Dangerous Sense: Taste, Eroticism, and Violence in Poem in Couplets 16
(Language: English)
Lydia Shahan, Faculteit Theologie en Religiewetenschappen, KU Leuven
Lydia Shahan, Faculteit Theologie en Religiewetenschappen, KU Leuven
Index terms: Gender Studies, Theology
Paper 819-cBeing God: Medieval Mystics in Schelling's Idealism
(Language: English)
Andrés Quero-Sánchez, Max-Weber-Kolleg für kultur- und sozialwissenschaftliche Studien, Universität Erfurt
Andrés Quero-Sánchez, Max-Weber-Kolleg für kultur- und sozialwissenschaftliche Studien, Universität Erfurt
Index terms: Philosophy, Religious Life, Theology
Abstract

The session will examine Augustine, Anselm, Eckhart and Tauler. The first paper will focus on Augustine’s short treatise On the Usefulness of Fasting, examining how Augustine has wrongly be characterised as splitting body from soul in his spiritual anthropology. The second paper wlll examine Anselm’s De Sacramentis, on Eucharistic praxis – ‘eating God’ in the Holy Eucharist – showing how Anselm prioritised a ‘unity of love’ rather than custom between East and West. The third paper will focus on deification in German mystics (Eckhart, Tauler, and the Pseudo-Taulerian Book of Spiritual Poverty) considering Schelling’s reading of the above authors and their work.