IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 836: How to Perceive of Piracy and Maritime Violence in Late Medieval Europe, II

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Thomas Heebøll-Holm, Institut for Historie, Syddansk Universitet, Odense
Gregor Rohmann, Historisches Seminar, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Moderator/Chair:Flávio Miranda, Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Universidade Nova de Lisboa / Centro de Investigação Transdisciplinar: Cultura, Espaço e Memória, Universidade do Porto
Paper 836-a'By their fruits shall ye know them': Telling Pirates apart from Corsairs in the Medieval Mediterranean
(Language: English)
Emily Sohmer Tai, Department of History, Queensborough Community College, City University of New York
Emily Sohmer Tai, Department of History, Queensborough Community College, City University of New York
Index terms: Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban, Law, Maritime and Naval Studies
Paper 836-bPopes and Pirates: Paul Beneke and the Portinari-Triptych
(Language: English)
Tobias Daniels, Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Roma
Tobias Daniels, Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Roma
Index terms: Canon Law, Economics - Trade, Law, Maritime and Naval Studies
Paper 836-cBetween Piratae and Milites Maritimis: A Tentative Typology of Medieval Maritime Predators
(Language: English)
Thomas Heebøll-Holm, Institut for Historie, Syddansk Universitet, Odense
Thomas Heebøll-Holm, Institut for Historie, Syddansk Universitet, Odense
Index terms: Economics - Trade, Law, Maritime and Naval Studies, Military History
Abstract

Modern historiography usually claims that medieval trade was constantly threatened by pirates and that piracy was endemic in medieval Europe. The sessions ‘How to Perceive of Piracy and Maritime Violence in Late Medieval Europe’ I & II aim at challenging this assumption. By bringing together specialists in medieval maritime history from Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United States, we seek to investigate the role of merchants and mariners as both victims and agents of violence at sea, as well as that of public authorities and institutions in the curbing or encouragement of maritime predatory activity. Thus these sessions seeks to shed new light on the grey area between war, trade, and crime.