IMC 2017: Sessions

Session 1004: The Horse in Courtly Literature

Wednesday 5 July 2017, 09.00-10.30

Organisers:Timothy Dawson, Independent Scholar, Leeds
Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga
Moderator/Chair:Edgar Rops, Faculty of Law, University of Latvia, Riga
Paper 1004-aMore Expensive than Racing Cars: The Value of Horses in Romance
(Language: English)
Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - French or Occitan
Paper 1004-bWriting Bodies, Riding Equipment, Reading Horses: The Equestrian Canon and Code of Chivalry
(Language: English)
Karen Campbell, Department of English, Grayson College, Texas
Index terms: Anthropology, Archaeology - Artefacts, Language and Literature - Comparative, Mentalities
Paper 1004-cHow to Ride before a Prince: The Rise of Riding as a Performance Art
(Language: English)
Jennifer Jobst, Independent Scholar, Sunset Valley, Texas
Index terms: Anthropology, Language and Literature - Comparative, Mentalities, Performance Arts - General
Abstract

Horses are prominent in a variety of courtly literatures – from romance to treatises on chivalry in the High and Late Middle Ages, and, at the end of the medieval period, the first riding manuals compete for attention among other, increasingly varying, treatises of instruction. In the session, the speakers examine the characteristics marking elite horses and riders. In particular, the papers testify to the changing standards of horsemanship from the 13th century into the early modern period, when riding skill evolves into an art of horsemanship and, later, a performance.