IMC 2017: Sessions

Session 1025: The Astonishing Middle Ages in Polish Countries, 10th-15th Centuries: Mysterious Art, Strange Inhabitants, Unusual Graves

Wednesday 5 July 2017, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Institute of History of Art & Culture, Pontifical University of John Paul II, Kraków
Organiser:Dariusz Tabor, Institute of History of Art & Culture, Pontifical University of John Paul II, Kraków
Moderator/Chair:Karol Polejowski, Muzeum Zamkowe w Malborku / Malbork Castle Museum
Paper 1025-aThe Strange Burials from the Early Middle Ages Excavated in the Polish Regions
(Language: English)
Sławomir Dryja, Institute of History of Art & Culture, Pontifical University of John Paul II, Kraków
Index terms: Anthropology, Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - Sites, Mentalities
Paper 1025-bThe Hero Fighting with Monsters: Gilgamesh of Central Europe? - The Mysterious Representation on the Carved Capital from the Church in Czerwińsk
(Language: English)
Dariusz Tabor, Institute of History of Art & Culture, Pontifical University of John Paul II, Kraków
Index terms: Art History - Sculpture, Biblical Studies, Language and Literature - Semitic, Religious Life
Paper 1025-cHomo novus homo suspectus?: Guests in the Towns of the Magdeburg Law in the Kingdom of Poland, 14th- Early 16th Century
(Language: English)
Maciej Mikuła, Wydział Prawa i Administracji, Uniwersytet Jagielloński, Kraków
Index terms: Daily Life, Economics - Urban, Law, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

This session is dedicated to some strange phenomenons of Polish medieval culture from 10th to 15th centuries. Sławomir Dryja takes in consideration strange and unexpected burials just in time of early Christianity in Poland. The author presents his research about the function and origin of these graves. Dariusz Tabor studies the low relief from capital of portal in the church of Czerwińsk. He tries to discover a true meaning of this sculpture and he gives answer to the question, if the name ‘Gilgamesh’ , attributed to the hero from capital, fighting with two monsters, is justified.