IMC 2017: Sessions

Session 1041: Sharp Thinking: New Research on Early Medieval Swords

Wednesday 5 July 2017, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden
Organiser:Annemarieke Willemsen, Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden
Moderator/Chair:Nelleke IJssennagger, Faculteit der Letteren, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen / Archaeological & Medieval Collections, Frisian Museum, Leeuwarden
Paper 1041-aLost on Purpose?: Carolingian Swords from European Rivers
(Language: English)
Dušan Maczek, Independent Scholar, Bratislava
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Art History - Decorative Arts, Military History
Paper 1041-bA Hack-Sword?: The Golden Hilt in the Bedale Hoard
(Language: English)
Sue Brunning, British Museum, London
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Art History - Decorative Arts, Military History
Paper 1041-cMixed Emotions: The Swords from Carolingian Dorestad
(Language: English)
Annemarieke Willemsen, Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Art History - Decorative Arts, Daily Life, Military History
Paper 1041-dSymbols Losing Meaning?: On the Decline of the Pattern-Welded Sword
(Language: English)
Ulrich Lehmann, Landschaftsverband Westfalen-Lippe (LWL) - Archäologie für Westfalen, Münster
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Art History - Decorative Arts, Military History
Abstract

Broadswords, with their often lavishly decorated hilts, are among the best known and most admired objects of the Early medieval period (500-1000 AD). Perceived as warrior attributes and known mostly as princely grave goods, they have become strong symbols of martiality and kingship. New finds like the many demolished sword parts in the Staffordshire Hoard, together with fresh assessment of the many sword finds from settlements and river contexts, are changing our views of this highly individual weapon and its various and often complex meanings in the Early Middle Ages.