IMC 2017: Sessions

Session 1042: The Other Power: The Power of the Others - An Attempt to Re-Theorize the Rulership in Late Medieval Europe, 1300-1500, I

Wednesday 5 July 2017, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Institut d'Histoire, Université du Luxembourg, Belval
Organisers:Éloïse Adde, Institut d'Histoire, Université du Luxembourg, Belval
Anna Jagošová, Institut d'Histoire, Université du Luxembourg, Belval
Moderator/Chair:Éloïse Adde, Institut d'Histoire, Université du Luxembourg, Belval
Paper 1042-aThe Officials of the Angevin Kings: Career Mobility and the Reception of 'Foreign Government'
(Language: English)
Fanny Madeline, Laboratoire de Médiévistique Occidentale de Paris (LAMOP - UMR 8589), Université Paris I - Panthéon-Sorbonne
Index terms: Administration, Local History
Paper 1042-bA Foreign King in Bohemia: The Political Communication between John the Blind and the Bohemian Nobility, 1310-1318
(Language: English)
Éloïse Adde, Institut d'Histoire, Université du Luxembourg, Belval
Index terms: Administration, Mentalities, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1042-cShared Rule or Separate Households?: Political and Administrative Vocabulary in the Charters of the Ruler's Consorts and Queens from the House of Luxemburg - From Margaret of Brabant to Elisabeth of Luxemburg
(Language: English)
Anna Jagošová, Institut d'Histoire, Université du Luxembourg, Belval
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

Contrary to the image produced by the medieval administration and later historiography, the ruler was never only the King of a given country but cumulated also several additional titles and functions related either to his inherited dynastic possessions or to his political dignity. How did he deal with the superposition of this several powers from diverse origins and natures? How did he consider his own action? How was he perceived by the subjects under his authority? Which tools and personal did he have at his deposal to administrate the territories related to these titles? The distinction and delimitation of the powers and tasks were not clear at this period, so that competences related to these several titles and functions could get mixed up. Knowingly used or not, such a confusion was problematic but could also be profitable to the ruler as to the subjects according to the situation and context. The case of the Roman Holy Empire is obviously an ‘ideal-type’ for such a study and will be the subject of the first part of the meeting. The second part will be devoted to a comparison with other European political entities to get a more precise and qualified view of the subject and to map the phenomenon in its diversity.