IMC 2017: Sessions

Session 132: Inquisitional Records from the Perspective of Social Network Analysis

Monday 3 July 2017, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Department for the Study of Religions, Masaryk University, Brno
Organiser:David Zbíral, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Moderator/Chair:Reima Välimäki, Department of Cultural History / Turku Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies, University of Turku
Respondent:Andrew P. Roach, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Paper 132-aNetworking Heresy: A Comparative Approach to Religious Dissent in Late Medieval Languedoc
(Language: English)
Delfi-Isabel Nieto-Isabel, Departament d'Història Medieval, Paleografia i Diplomàtica, Universitat de Barcelona
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 132-bThe Participation of Women (and Some Men) in Languedocian Catharism: A Network Science Perspective
(Language: English)
David Zbíral, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Religious Life, Social History
Abstract

For decades scholars have emphasied the importance of family and friendship ties as well as the role of gender in the transmission and functioning of religious dissent in medieval Europe. However, the tools used to address these questions have been limited and in many ways inadequate. Answers to these questions have been marked by an anecdotic approach, while quantitative studies have remained extremely rare, and their results open to questioning due to the use of methods which were not adapted to address the structural aspects of social ties. This session may well be the first to employ the methods of network science in order to inquire into the social structures of dissident Christianities as portrayed in inquisitional records. By addressing some classic questions using new tools, it aims to demonstrate the opportunities that network science can offer to the study of inquisitional records.