IMC 2017: Sessions

Session 139: The Digital Scribe: Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) of Medieval Documents

Monday 3 July 2017, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Project 'Recognition & Enrichment of Archival Documents' (READ)
Organiser:Tobias Hodel, Staatsarchiv des Kantons Zürich
Moderator/Chair:Johanna Green, Humanities Advanced Technology & Information Institute, University of Glasgow
Paper 139-aFrom Memoria to the Memory of the Turning Points of Life: Matricula-Online and HTR
(Language: English)
Herbert Wurster, Archiv, Bistum Passau
Elena Mühlbauer, Archiv, Bistum Passau
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Local History, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 139-bTranskribus and the Archives of a Brigittine Monastery: Making Digital Editions of Naantali Documents
(Language: English)
Maria Kallio, National Archives of Finland, Helsinki
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Monasticism
Paper 139-cSending 15th-Century Missives through Algorithms: Testing and Evaluating HTR with 2,200 Documents
(Language: English)
Tobias Hodel, Staatsarchiv des Kantons Zürich
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Local History, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Transcriptions and editions are still mostly produced by human effort but advances in automatic layout analysis and text recognition can enable researchers to work with medieval sources in new ways. This panel will showcase the Transkribus transcription tool, which makes it possible for users to automatically transcribe and search digital images of handwritten historical documents. The panel will demonstrate how this technology has been applied to different sets of medieval documents: from 15th-century missives in early modern German to sacramental registers and Brigittine charters. This new technology promises to facilitate transcription and research for scholars, archivists, and the public.