IMC 2017: Sessions

Session 1533: Exegesis and Its Carolingian Contexts, I: Monks, Priests, and Emperors in the Carolingian Renovatio

Thursday 6 July 2017, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews / Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship 'BIBLACE' (no. 655748)
Organisers:Gerda Heydemann, Geschichte der Spätantike und des frühen Mittelalters, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Frances Murray, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Moderator/Chair:Rutger Kramer, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 1533-aBenedict's Bible: Exegesis and Monastic Reform
(Language: English)
Matthieu van der Meer, Department of Languages, Literatures & Linguistics, Syracuse University, New York
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Political Thought
Paper 1533-bHrabanus's Maurus Commentary on Matthew and the Renewal in Early Medieval Mainz
(Language: English)
Owen M. Phelan, Department of Church History, Mount St Mary's University, Maryland
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Political Thought
Paper 1533-c'Uncontrollable Delights and Boundless Exultation': Weeping as a rex et sacerdos in Hrabanus Maurus's Exegesis
(Language: English)
Frances Murray, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Political Thought
Abstract

This is the first of three panels which set out to explore the relationship between exegetical knowledge and wider Carolingian debates about social order and political practice. This panel looks at the concern for reform which marked the intellectual culture of the Carolingian period. Using an anonymous early 9th-century gloss on the Rule of St Benedict, the first paper will reconstruct the editorial choices made by Smaragdus of St Mihiel as he composed his commentary on this text. The second paper compares Hrabanus Maurus’s commentary on Matthew and his De institutione clericorum to investiage his ideas about reform. The final paper will explore Hrabanus’s expectations surrounding imperial behavior, specifically weeping, in his commentaries, arguing that Hrabanus envisaged rulers behaving as quasi-monks or priests.