IMC 2017: Sessions

Session 221: Regional Outcasts in Medieval Europe, II: Fools, Heretics, and Pagans between Eastern and Western Regions

Monday 3 July 2017, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Universität Salzburg
Organiser:Siegrid Schmidt, Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalter und Frühneuzeit (IZMF), Universität Salzburg
Moderator/Chair:Siegrid Schmidt, Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalter und Frühneuzeit (IZMF), Universität Salzburg
Paper 221-aUnderstanding Russia: 'The Holy Fool in Russian Culture and Civilisation'
(Language: English)
Ursula Bieber, Fachbereich Slawistik / Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalter und Frühneuzeit (IZMF), Universität Salzburg
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature - Slavic
Paper 221-bVagabonding Actor of the Habsburg-Reich: From the Late Middle Ages to (Early) Modern Times
(Language: English)
Gerhard Ammerer, Fachbereich Geschichte, Universität Salzburg
Index terms: Folk Studies, Local History, Performance Arts - Drama
Paper 221-cThe Land of Renewal and Salvation: The Impact of the So-Called Lutherklage on the Depiction of the Netherlands in Dürer’s Diary of the Journey to the Netherlands
(Language: English)
Raoul Marc Etienne DuBois, Deutsches Seminar, Universität Zürich
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Daily Life, Language and Literature - German
Abstract

A special appearance of social otherness is figuratively represented in outcasts of different kinds. Several research groups and projects of history and literature in Salzburg deal with medieval everyday life that is frequently connected with those outcasts. They are situated in the region of Salzburg itself but of course also in other areas. This session has its focus on the more or less religious outcasts of the Christians within their own religion and of other religions. Some of them are connected with a specific area, as the Russian ‘Holy Fool’. He is the Russian version of Foolishness for Christ, a particular form of Eastern Orthodox asceticism. The ‘Holy Fool’ had a particular status in regard to the Tsar, as a figure not subject to earthly control or judgement. The Heretical sects and their outcasts are more widespreaded over Europe and it is not quite clear up to now how Byzantine people come to an imperial grave in Ingelheim.