IMC 2017: Sessions

Session 517: DISTAFF, I: Dressing Otherness - Garments as Expressions of Diverse Ethnicity in Medieval Iberia

Tuesday 4 July 2017, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Discussion, Interpretation & Study of Textile Arts, Fabrics & Fashions (DISTAFF)
Organiser:Nahum Ben-Yehuda, Department of Land of Israel Studies & Archaeology, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan
Moderator/Chair:Nahum Ben-Yehuda, Department of Land of Israel Studies & Archaeology, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan
Paper 517-aThe Fascination for the 'Other': Medieval Andalusian Garments and Trousseaus with Castilian Names
(Language: English)
Maria Dolores Serrano-Niza, Departamento de Filologia Clásica, Francesca, Árabe y Románica, Universidad de La Laguna
Index terms: Art History - Decorative Arts, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Language and Literature - Spanish or Portuguese
Paper 517-bThe Role of Jews and Muslims in Dressing Up Portuguese Medieval Society
(Language: English)
Joana Isabel Sequeira, Centro de Investigação Transdisciplinar 'Cultura, Espaço e Memória' (CITCEM), Universidade do Porto / Centro de Humanidades, Universidade Nova de Lisboa / Universidade dos Açores
Index terms: Daily Life, Economics - General, Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Paper 517-cThe Las Huelgas Textile Grave Goods as Expressions of the Medieval Iberian Attitude Towards Otherness
(Language: English)
María Barrigón, Departamento de Conservación, Palacio Real, Patrimonio Nacional, Madrid
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Art History - Decorative Arts, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Abstract

This session will examine, from various viewpoints, ethnic diversity and the attitude toward otherness in Medieval Iberia, as related to garments and textiles. The first paper will deal with Andalusian garments and trousseaus bearing Castilian names, which will be identified and illustrated. The second paper will discuss the roles of Jews and Muslims in Portuguese textile production and their respective cultural and technical legacies. The final paper will examine the role and implications of Castilian royal textile grave-goods and their Arabic ornamentation – imported from Al-Andalus.