IMC 2017: Sessions

Session 627: Looking at 'the Other' in Medieval Western Islamic Societies

Tuesday 4 July 2017, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:ArtMedGIS Project 'Analysis of the Artistic Exchanges in the Medieval Mediterranean between 12th and 15th Centuries through the Geographical Information Systems (GIS)' (MSCA - H2020) / Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Organiser:Maria Marcos Cobaleda, Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Moderator/Chair:Maria Marcos Cobaleda, Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Paper 627-aReligious, Social, and Cultural Attitudes to Water in Al-Andalus: Conflict and Co-Existence
(Language: English)
Ieva Reklaityte, Independent Scholar, Zaragoza
Index terms: Daily Life, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Mentalities
Paper 627-bThe Almoravid Art as Sign of Identity: Interactions with Other Mediterranean Cultures
(Language: English)
Maria Marcos Cobaleda, Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Index terms: Architecture - General, Art History - General, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Paper 627-cTwo Opposite Artistic Identities with a Shared Mediterranean History: The Almohads and the Others ('the Ayyubids')
(Language: English)
Dolores Villalba Sola, Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Index terms: Architecture - General, Art History - General, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Paper 627-dThe Vision of the Germans in Cartas de Itália of Lopo de Almeida, 15th Century
(Language: English)
Paulo Catarino Lopes, Instituto de Estudos Medievais / Centro de História d’Aquém e d’Além-Mar, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Mentalities, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The aim of this session is to analyze the relations and interactions of medieval Western Islamic societies with ‘the other’ in a wider meaning. Traditionally, the Islamic, Christian and Jewish societies have been considered as contrary for religious reasons, especially in the case of Al-Andalus. However, this concept must be understood in a wider sense, to the extent that coreligionist societies have been considered as ‘the other’ many times. Within these Islamic societies, the recognition of ‘the otherness’ as an element that differentiates from has helped to build their own identity. During this session, it will be analyzed how the political, religious, social, cultural and artistic interactions among these ‘opposite’ societies have contributed to the definition of themselves.