IMC 2017: Sessions

Session 629: Otherness, Monstrosity, and Deviation in Old Norse Literature and Culture, II: Splinter Groups and Rogue Sagas

Tuesday 4 July 2017, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Old Norse Network of Otherness (ONNO)
Organisers:Gwendolyne Knight, Historiska institutionen, Stockholms Universitet
Rebecca Merkelbach, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Moderator/Chair:K. James McMullen, School of Museum Studies, University of Leicester
Paper 629-aOtherness on the Page: How Do Lacunae Affect the Way We Interact with Saga Narrative?
(Language: English)
Joanne Shortt Butler, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 629-bThe Other Sagas: Hero, Society, and the Paranormal in the 'Post-Classical' Íslendingasögur
(Language: English)
Rebecca Merkelbach, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Mentalities, Social History
Paper 629-cThe Otherness in Finnboga Saga Ramma
(Language: English)
Þórdís Edda Jóhannesdóttir, School of Humanities, University of Iceland, Reykjavík
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Introducing the newly formed Old Norse Network of Otherness, and as part of a series of sessions, these papers explore a variety of issues concerning the representations of and attitudes toward different forms of otherness, monstrosity, and deviation in medieval Icelandic literature and culture, and beyond. These sessions are meant to complement the proposed sessions entitled ‘Men and Masculinities in Old Norse Literature’. Drawing on a variety of theoretical and comparative approaches, questions of behavioural, socio-cultural, and textual otherness will be addressed, and the interplay of genre, character, text, and culture will be explored through the others, monsters, and deviants of Old Norse literature and history. This second session explores the texts, contexts and manuscripts of some less-studied family sagas, and addresses questions of fragmentation, genre, and social context.