IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1003: Moving Byzantium, I: Methods, Tools, and Concepts across Disciplines

Wednesday 4 July 2018, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Moving Byzantium: Mobility, Microstructures & Personal Agency, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Universität Wien / FWF Wittgenstein-Prize Project
Organiser:Claudia Rapp, Institut für Byzantinistik & Neogräzistik, Universität Wien / Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Moderator/Chair:Claudia Rapp, Institut für Byzantinistik & Neogräzistik, Universität Wien / Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 1003-aMapping Byzantine Mobility: Digital Tools and Analytical Concepts
(Language: English)
Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Computing in Medieval Studies, Geography and Settlement Studies, Social History
Paper 1003-bDigital Mobility: Byzantine Prosopography, Networks, and Space
(Language: English)
Ekaterini Mitsiou, Institut für Byzantinistik & Neogräzistik, Universität Wien
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Geography and Settlement Studies
Paper 1003-cPottery Traditions 'beyond' Byzantium: Production and Supply in Rural and Urban Contexts within the Frankish Duchy of Athens and Thebes
(Language: English)
Florence Liard, Fitch Laboratory, British School at Athens
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Byzantine Studies, Economics - Trade, Technology
Paper 1003-dRethinking Sites of Production for Early Byzantine Visual Culture
(Language: English)
Elizabeth Bolman, Department of Art History & Art, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio
Index terms: Art History - General, Byzantine Studies, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Monasticism
Abstract

The project Moving Byzantium highlights the role of Byzantium as a global culture and analyses the internal flexibility of Byzantine society. It aims to contribute to a re-evaluation of a society and culture that has traditionally been depicted as stiff, rigid, and encumbered by its own tradition. This will be achieved by the exploration of issues of mobility, microstructures, and personal agency. In this session, new approaches to these questions from the perspectives of digital humanities (including HGIS and network theory), social history, archaeology, and art history will be presented and discussed.