IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1026: Norman Women Rulers, I: Memory, Myth, and Damnation

Wednesday 4 July 2018, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Organiser:Francesca Petrizzo, School of History, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Rachael Gillibrand, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 1026-aEmma of Normandy and Her Legacy: The Encomium Emmae Reginae and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, 1035-1044
(Language: English)
Florence Scott, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Latin, Women's Studies
Paper 1026-bWilliam of Tyre and the Problem of the Antiochene Princesses
(Language: English)
Andrew David Buck, School of History, Queen Mary University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin, Women's Studies
Paper 1026-cMemories of Norman Sicily in 17th-Century Palermo: The Cult of Santa Rosalia in Its Historical Context
(Language: English)
Dawn Marie Hayes, Department of History, Montclair State University, New Jersey
Index terms: Hagiography, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Religious Life, Women's Studies
Abstract

This is the first of two sessions dealing with the memory of Norman women in power across the Mediterranean and Europe. Literary homage, literary condemnation, and religious worship can all determine the ways the memory of powerful women is shaped, transmitted, and sometimes transformed. In the first paper, Florence Scott examines how the powerful Emma, queen of England, influenced the works of history about her tenure. In the second, Andrew Buck tackles William of Tyre’s controversial treatment of Antiochene princesses. In the third, Dawn Hayes examines the enduring power of the cult of St Rosalia of Palermo.