IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1035: Archival Memory: Institutions, Texts, and Shapes, I

Wednesday 4 July 2018, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Organiser:Sébastien Barret, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Moderator/Chair:Dominique Stutzmann, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Paper 1035-aThe Cartulary of Egmond Abbey, c. 1420
(Language: English)
Jan W. J. Burgers, Huygens Instituut voor Nederlandse Geschiedenis, Koninklijke Nederlandse Academie van Wetenschappen (ING - KNAW), Amsterdam / Capaciteitsgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1035-bActive Scribes and Active Memory in Late Medieval Scottish Cartularies
(Language: English)
Joanna Tucker, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1035-cRecording, Administrating, and Claiming Rights: One Example of the Archival Work in Saint-Germain-Des-Prés
(Language: English)
Louis Genton, Institut d'études culturelles et internationales (IECI), Université Paris-Saclay
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Medieval charters and archives were a natural component of an institution’s memory: acts and deeds constituted primarily a way to keep and preserve the remembrance of a legal or para-legal action for the future. But beyond this evident fact, such documents could also be used to produce, or take part in, specific memorial discourses. This session deals with the process of cartularization and its links to the institution’s memory and collective identity in the 13th century (Saint-Germain des Prés), and 15th century (Holland, Scotland.)