IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 111: Was There an 11th Century?, I: Institutions

Monday 2 July 2018, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Department of History, King's College London
Organisers:Rory Naismith, Department of History, King's College London
Danica Summerlin, Department of History, University of Sheffield
Moderator/Chair:Alice Taylor, Department of History, King's College London
Paper 111-aForging Exemption in 11th-Century France: Fleury from Abbo to Gauzlin
(Language: English)
Levi Roach, Department of History, University of Exeter
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Law, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 111-bPlacita, Curiae, and Making Sense of 11th-Century Legal Institutions: Western France, 980-1120
(Language: English)
Matthew McHaffie, Department of History, King's College London
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Law, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 111-cCanon Law on the Peripheries: Re-Thinking Reform in 11th-Century Church Councils
(Language: English)
Kathleen Cushing, Department of History, Keele University
Index terms: Administration, Canon Law, Ecclesiastical History
Abstract

While the 11th century continues to be seen as a pivotal period, it tends to be fragmented. Whether looking at papal and monastic reform, urban transformation, feudal revolution or legal change, the individual perspectives separate the 11th century into chunks which look either forwards or backwards, but less often sideways at recent or simultaneous developments. The papers in these sessions think outside the historical boxes into which the 11th century is usually compartmentalised, looking at and critiquing the events and ideas of the period to discuss contemporary institutions, real or idealised.