IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1135: Archival Memory: Institutions, Texts, and Shapes, II

Wednesday 4 July 2018, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Organiser:Dominique Stutzmann, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Moderator/Chair:Sébastien Barret, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Paper 1135-a'Memories false and real': Memorial Aspects of Episcopal Charters from 13th-Century Livonia
(Language: English)
Edgar Rops, Independent Scholar, Latvia
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1135-bPreserving Missives at Metz during the 15th Century: An Administrative Memory of Legal Practices?
(Language: English)
Amélie Marineau-Pelletier, Department of History, University of Ottawa / Centre de Recherches Historiques, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Paris
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1135-cAn Imaginary Frailty?: Memory Discourses in Charters, 7th-13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Nicolas Perreaux, Sonderforschungsbereich 1095 'Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main / Laboratoire de médiévistique occidentale de Paris (LaMOP), Université de la Sorbonne, Paris
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Charters and Diplomatics, Computing in Medieval Studies, Mentalities
Abstract

Medieval charters and archives were a natural component of an institution’s memory: acts and deeds constituted primarily a way to keep and preserve the remembrance of a legal or para-legal action for the future. But beyond this evident fact, such documents could also be used to produce, or take part in, specific memorial discourses. This session seeks to explore the production of memorial discourse in various types of single-sheet documents at different levels of granularity, from individual charters to letter collections and, finally, ‘diplomatic big data.’