IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1145: At the Cutting Edge of Digital Memory: The Online Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland - Post-Conquest Carving at Your Fingertips, II

Wednesday 4 July 2018, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI)
Organiser:Karen Impey, Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI), London
Moderator/Chair:Eric Campbell Fernie, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London
Paper 1145-aBaptismal Fonts, II: The Romanesque Coleby Font Group - A Design, Distribution, and Iconographic Analysis
(Language: English)
Thomas E. Russo, Department of Fine & Performing Arts, Drury University, Missouri
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - Sculpture
Paper 1145-bFor the Record: Putting the Romanesque Sculpture of Wales Online
(Language: English)
David M. Robinson, Independent Scholar, London
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - Sculpture
Paper 1145-cBaptismal Fonts, III: Magnates in the Midlands
(Language: English)
Susan Nettle, Independent Scholar, Teddington
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - Sculpture
Abstract

Mainland Europe’s connection with Britain and Ireland became arterial during the art-historical period dubbed Romanesque, a pejorative term coined by antiquaries, dismissing the pan-European architectural styles of the 11th and 12th centuries as ‘sub-Roman’.Though adumbrated by classical forms, Romanesque architecture was innovative, notably as a matrix for carved ornament. A post-conquest building boom in Britain combined with a shift in liturgical practice to produce a skilled workforce and an increasingly articulated and perforate masonry architecture: columnar and arcuated, its inter-connecting nodes of focal interest – arcades, capitals, imposts, voussoirs, doorways – called for distinctive carved embellishment. What survives, be it figural, foliate, or geometric, on buildings and on furniture, ranges from the unsophisticated to the exquisite, the finest rendered with the delicacy of carved ivory and metalwork. The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland (CRSBI) is using interactive digital technology to construct a scholarly database of the stone carving created during the century following the Norman Conquest. Launched with British Academy support, CRSBI, an illustrated online record of the Romanesque sculpture surviving at over 5000 sites, is both searchable and free to use. These papers, by contributors to the database, demonstrate its research potential.