IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1247: 'Remember me when I am gone': Methods of Personal Commemoration

Wednesday 4 July 2018, 14.15-15.45

Moderator/Chair:Věra Soukupová, Department of History, University of Ostrava / Department of Czech History, Univerzita Karlova, Praha
Paper 1247-aCommunal and Personal Commemoration on East Anglian Screens
(Language: English)
Lucy Wrapson, Hamilton Kerr Institute, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Painting, Lay Piety, Local History
Paper 1247-bJordan Fantosme / Jordan de Sandford: The Personal Memory of War
(Language: English)
Fletcher Crowe, Independent Scholar, Florida
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Military History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1247-cPersonal Memory through Notarial Sources
(Language: English)
Miquel Faus, Departament d'Història Medieval, Història Moderna i Ciències i Tècniques Historiogràfiques, Universitat de València
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Daily Life, Literacy and Orality, Social History
Paper 1247-dWhat Must Be Remembered: The Notarial Register as a Source for Studying Social and Political Memory?
(Language: English)
Javier Fajardo Paños, Departament d'Història Medieval, Història Moderna i Ciències i Tècniques Historiogràfiques, Universitat de València
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Daily Life, Literacy and Orality, Social History
Abstract

Paper -a:
Surviving painted schemes on late medieval East Anglian rood screens demonstrate that they could act as a vehicle both for communal memory and specific commemoration of individuals. This paper seeks to identify strategies for commemoration on screens, from individual depictions and inscriptions to merchants’ marks. Specific attention to be paid to depictions, inscriptions, and payments relating screens to tomb brasses as at Ludham (Norfolk), formerly at Thornham (Norfolk), and St John Maddermarket in Norwich. Having established the range of visual and textual commemorative practices, the paper will go on to address how communities squared individual commemoration with communal fundraising in the case of rood screens.

Paper -b:
In 1174 an author with the pen name of ‘Jordan Fantosme’ composed a well-known rhyming poem in Anglo-Norman French entitled in English Chronicle of the War between the English and Scots in 1173 and 1174. Jordan’s Chronicle relates his eyewitness memory of events in the two-year war in which the troops of Henry II overcame a revolt led by his son, called the ‘Young King’. Jordan’s important estoire provides an action-packed personal memory of military and diplomatic events, vastly different than the scholarly accounts of medieval historians like Orderic Vitalis or Master Wace. However, almost nothing has been known about the author himself. This presentation will, for the first time, identify ‘Jordan Fantosme’ as Jordan de Sandford, a member of a wealthy Anglo-Norman baronial family. Knowing his life and family background leads to an entirely new interpretation of Jordan’s Chronicle as an after-dinner entertainment recitation performed at the king’s banquet in early 1175.

Paper -c:
Notarial protocols are one of the richest ways to study social and economic history in the late Middle Ages, but in some of these registers we can also find a whole variety of writings non-related with their profession. Most of them are references to episodes of the notary’s personal life or other events that happened in his daily life and context. By analysing these pieces of information as a whole we can build a sort of ‘personal diary’ which can give better understanding of the kind of events that were important to these groups during the 15th century.

Paper -d:
Notarial protocols are one of the richest ways to study social and economic history in the Late Middle Ages, but in some of these registers. We can also find a whole variety of writings non-related with their profession. Some of them are mentions and narrations of some political events and other episodes related to the city and kingdom of Valencia. If we study these references as a whole and compare them with other narrative and historiographical sources we can get a better idea of which incidents stay recorded in memory of these notaries in comparison of what historians consider the main events of the 15th century.