IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 126: Women's Strategies of Memory, I: Trauma and Reconstruction

Monday 2 July 2018, 11.15-12.45

Organisers:Lucy Allen, Newnham College, University of Cambridge
Emma Bridget O'Loughlin Bérat, Institut für Anglistik, Amerikanistik und Keltologie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
Moderator/Chair:Ruen-chuan Ma, Department of English & Literature, Utah Valley University
Paper 126-aA Textile Habitus of Memory in Chaucer's Legend of Philomela
(Language: English)
Lucy Allen, Newnham College, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Women's Studies
Paper 126-bHanna the Maccabi: A Healing and Restorative Memory from a Feminine Sexual Trauma in the Rabbinic Literature
(Language: English)
Dvora Lederman Daniely, Department of Education, David Yellin College, Jerusalem
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Language and Literature - Semitic, Women's Studies
Paper 126-cRe-Membering the Drowned: The Rebellious Recollection of Noah's Wife in the York, Chester, and Towneley Flood Pageants
(Language: English)
Daisy Black, Department of English Language, TESOL & Applied Linguistics, Swansea University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Performance Arts - Drama, Women's Studies
Paper 126-dRevising 'Remembrance': Custance's Strategies of Memory in Chaucer's Man of Law's Tale
(Language: English)
Emma Bridget O'Loughlin Bérat, Institut für Anglistik, Amerikanistik und Keltologie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
Index terms: Gender Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - French or Occitan
Abstract

Memory was widely accessible to medieval women as means of personal and political influence. Our series of three panels examines how women used and created strategic representations of the past to serve their own present or future purposes, including those of their kin and communities. This panel focuses on literary representations of women’s tactics for managing and revising personal traumatic memory, as well as the place of these memories in broader memorial discourses. Examining Rabbinic literature to crusader romance and English cycle plays, speakers explore how female characters’ deliberate reconstructions help to resist supersessionary retellings and to insert – in sensitive, healing, or aggressive ways – women’s perspectives into histories that seek to erase them.