IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 133: Remembering the Viking Age around the Irish Sea, I: International Identities

Monday 2 July 2018, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:ISMARN: The Irish Sea in the Middle Ages Research Network
Organiser:Lindy Brady, Department of English, University of Mississippi
Moderator/Chair:Ben Guy, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Paper 133-aA Hiberno-Scandinavian Origin Legend: Community and Identity in 11th and 12th Century Dublin and the Isles
(Language: English)
Patrick Wadden, Department of History, Belmont Abbey College, North Carolina
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Scandinavian
Paper 133-bImpressions of a 12th-Century Maritime Ruler: Somerled - Viking Warrior, Clan Chieftain, or Traitor to the Scottish King?
(Language: English)
Caitlin Ellis, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Scandinavian
Paper 133-cViking Age Heroic Biography around the Irish Sea
(Language: English)
Lindy Brady, Department of English, University of Mississippi
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Scandinavian
Abstract

In light of the IMC 2018 special focus on ‘Memory’, ISMARN (the Irish Sea in the Middle Ages Research Network) has organized two sessions on ‘Remembering the Viking Age Around the Irish Sea’. These papers seek to understand how the Viking Age was remembered, commemorated, and conceptualized by later medieval peoples from any language and culture within the Irish Sea zone. Our sessions ask: How was ‘the Viking Age’ understood or defined in the first place by various peoples in the Irish Sea region? How do textual and historical memories of the Viking Age change between cultures or across time periods? In what ways were memories of the Viking Age textually constructed as contemporary political or dynastic tools? How did antiquarian or later scholarly understanding of the Viking Age in the Irish Sea shape or skew our perception of this time period?