IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1335: Proprietary Memories: Notitiae-Inventories in Early Medieval Iberia, II

Wednesday 4 July 2018, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Organisers:Álvaro Carvajal Castro, Departamento de Geografía, Prehistoria y Arqueología, Universidad del País Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea
André Evangelista Marques, Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Moderator/Chair:Julio Escalona, Instituto de Historia, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Madrid
Paper 1335-aProperty Inventories from an Archaeological Perspective: The Case of the Monastic Landscapes of Samos, North-West Spain, 8th-11th Centuries
(Language: English)
José Carlos Sánchez Pardo, Departamento de Historia Medieval e Moderna, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela
José Carlos Sánchez-Pardo, Facultade de Xeografía e Historia, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela
Fernández Ferreiro Marcos, Facultade de Xeografía e Historia, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Economics - Rural, Geography and Settlement Studies, Monasticism
Paper 1335-bTraces of Absent Inventories: References to Notitiae in the Charters from North-West Iberia, 9th-11th Centuries
(Language: English)
Álvaro Carvajal Castro, Departamento de Geografía, Prehistoria y Arqueología, Universidad del País Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea
Index terms: Administration, Archives and Sources, Charters and Diplomatics, Economics - Rural
Paper 1335-cSub censuario iugo: The Census and Inventories in the First Decades of al-Andalus, c. 711-754
(Language: English)
Jesús Lorenzo Jiménez, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Vitoria-Gasteiz
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Economics - General, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Abstract

Early medieval inventories are commonly found among northern-Iberian archival holdings, both as single-sheets and cartulary copies. However, notwithstanding the extensive use that has sometimes been made of their contents, Spanish and Portuguese historians have largely failed to address the problems that this particular type of record poses, although some recent work is starting to change this picture. This is the second of three sessions that aim to provide a comparative overview of Iberian inventories before 1100, in order to identify and reflect upon the specificities of these records. Papers in this session will engage in less obvious approaches to inventories, such as their contribution to archaeology, the corpus of unknown notitiae referred to in extant charters, and the fiscal role of inventories in the aftermath of the Arab conquest.