IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1338: Architecture and the Memory of Otherness on the Iberian Peninsula

Wednesday 4 July 2018, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Michael A. Conrad, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich
Maria Portmann, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich
Moderator/Chairs:Michael A. Conrad, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich
Maria Portmann, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich
Paper 1338-aWalls of Silk: Parietal Decoration and Textiles in al-Andalus
(Language: English)
Asunción Lavesa, Departamento de Prehistoria y Arqueología, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Index terms: Architecture - General, Art History - General, Art History - Decorative Arts
Paper 1338-bThe Memory of al-Andalus: The Islamic Perspective
(Language: English)
April Najjaj, Department of History, Texas A&M University, San Antonio
Index terms: Architecture - General, Art History - General
Paper 1338-cRemembering Sepharad Places, Jewish Traditions, and Contemporary Christian Music on the Model of the Organ of Valeria Church (1435) in The Triptych of the Crucifixion attributed to Lluis Alincbrot (1450)
(Language: English)
Maria Portmann, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich
Index terms: Architecture - Secular, Art History - General, Art History - Painting
Abstract

We would like to focus on architectures and architectural elements of medieval Iberia that commemorate the past and relate to the complex cultural identities of its various religious and ethnic groups. How do these elements express their power, but maybe also their fragility and precarity as a result of threats of identity-loss? One central function of architecture is to commemorate. In the special case of medieval Iberia, this commemoration often relates to the past of one of its many ethnic and religious groups. Houses, palaces, churches, and monasteries, but also epitaphs, gravestones, memorial columns, or civic structures can be interpreted as materialisations of intentions of how to remember the past of these groups. We will therefore re-examine the concept of memory in architecture as an expression of otherness especially for those with precarious identities, such as the Mozarabs in al-Andalus or the Muslims and Jews under the Christian kings.