IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 137: Remembering and Forgetting the Ancient City, I: The Physical City

Monday 2 July 2018, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:ERC Project 'The Impact of the Ancient City'
Organisers:Javier Martínez-Jiménez, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Sam Ottewill-Soulsby, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Moderator/Chair:Sam Ottewill-Soulsby, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Respondent:Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Paper 137-aTrier as 'Roma Secunda': The Roman Past of Trier in the Long 10th Century
(Language: English)
Lenneke Van Raaij, Department of History, University of Exeter
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Architecture - Secular, Geography and Settlement Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 137-bDismantling Roman Pasts: New Monuments and New Identities at the End of the Early Middle Ages in Southern Gaul
(Language: English)
Javier Martínez-Jiménez, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Architecture - Religious, Geography and Settlement Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 137-cThe Post-Classical Life of an Athenian Suburban Precinct: Radical Appropriation or Multi-Layered Simultaneity?
(Language: English)
Elizabeth Key Fowden, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Architecture - General, Geography and Settlement Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Abstract

The relationship of the medieval city with the ancient city has received much debate in recent years. The theme of ‘memory’ offers new possibilities for considering how medieval people understood their cities in the context of those that had come before, whether by remembering them, or choosing to forget them. This first session is concerned with the importance of the physical remains of the ancient city as sources of urban memory. Lenneke Van Raaij examines the impact of the remains of the Roman past for communities in 10th-century Trier. Javier Martínez Jiménez addresses the manner in which the dismantling of Roman structures in Southern Gaul reflected the rise of new urban identities. Elizabeth Key Fowden then uses the Temple of Olympian Zeus in Athens to consider memory over the longue durée, delving through pagan, Christian, and Muslim responses to the past.