IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1535: Record, Memory, and the Making of History, I: Religion on the Record

Thursday 5 July 2018, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:The National Archives
Organisers:Abigail Dorr, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
Rebecca Searby, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Moderator/Chair:Paul R. Dryburgh, The National Archives, Kew
Paper 1535-aMemories of Persecution and the Making of History: John Foxe and the Heresy Trial Records of Early 16th-Century Kent
(Language: English)
Rob Lutton, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Literacy and Orality, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 1535-bConstructing Commemoration Narratives in Late Medieval Stanford
(Language: English)
Sheila Sweetinburgh, Centre for Kent History & Heritage, Canterbury Christ Church University
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Literacy and Orality, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 1535-cLinguistic Analysis of Medieval Latin Sermons: How Language Mixing in Sermons Can Act as a Record for Language Use
(Language: English)
Steph Kaefer, Department of English & Linguistics, University of Otago
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - Latin, Literacy and Orality, Sermons and Preaching
Abstract

Records – the official documents produced by court, crown and clergy – construct our understanding of the medieval world. They provide insight into the economic, legal and administrative practices of daily life. But do medieval records function beyond their customary role as depositaries for official information? How do records construct history? And whose history are they constructing? Using case studies from England and Sweden, this session will explore the presentation of religion, commemoration, and memory on the record.