IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1633: In Honour of Richard Holt, II: Townscapes and Urban Shapes

Thursday 5 July 2018, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:'Creating the New North' Research Programme, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Organiser:Stefan Figenschow, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Moderator/Chair:Sigrun Høgetveit Berg, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Paper 1633-aTransforming Townscapes in 12th-Century England
(Language: English)
Nigel Baker, School of Geography, Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Architecture - General, Architecture - Secular, Economics - Urban, Technology
Paper 1633-bNew Light on the Town of Birmingham in the Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Christopher Dyer, Centre for English Local History, University of Leicester
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Economics - Urban, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Local History
Paper 1633-cRibe's First Dwellers and the Beginnings of the Urbanisation of Scandinavia
(Language: English)
Sarah Croix, Afdeling for Arkaeologi og Kulturarvsstudier, Aarhus Universitet
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban, Historiography - Modern Scholarship
Paper 1633-dMedieval Norway's Urbanisation in a Danish Perspective
(Language: English)
Olav Elias Gundersen, Institut for Kultur og Samfund, Afdeling for Historie og Klassiske Studier, Aarhus Universitet
Index terms: Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Numismatics
Abstract

Many aspects of the larger English medieval towns appeared for the first time during the 12th century, meaning that towns of c.1200 looked very different to those of c.1100. More can be said about Birmingham as it became England’s ‘second city’, because while patchily documented it is an important example of a successful medieval town. The first residents of the emporium of Ribe in the 8th and 9th centuries provide insight into the early beginnings of the urbanisation of Scandinavia, at the same time anchored locally and connected over long distances. Norwegian urbanisation is often seen as somewhat of an outlier in a general European perspective, but was it also an exemption in a Scandinavian context?