IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1734: Memory and Identity in High Medieval Canterbury

Thursday 5 July 2018, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Marco Institute for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Organisers:Katie Hodges-Kluck, Marco Institute for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Alexandra Reider, Department of English, Yale University
Moderator/Chair:Katie Hodges-Kluck, Marco Institute for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Paper 1734-aRe-Writing the Defeat: Eadmer of Canterbury and the Norman Conquest
(Language: English)
Pia Zachary, Historisches Seminar, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit√§t M√ľnchen
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1734-bAnselmiad?: The Wanderings of Aeneas and Anselm and the Memory of the Council of Bari in William of Malmesbury's Gesta pontificum
(Language: English)
Jesse Harrington, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 1734-cThe Eadwine Psalter and Its Inherited Innovations
(Language: English)
Alexandra Reider, Department of English, Yale University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

This session examines the construction of memory and identity at Canterbury in the 11th-13th centuries through the prisms of medieval historiography, literature, and book history. Canterbury was a leading cultural center during this time, and its standing owed a great deal to the work and the legacy of influential figures such as the historian Eadmer, the archbishop Anselm, and Eadwine, called the ‘prince of scribes’. The papers in this session examine that work and legacy, focussing on Eadmer’s treatment of the Norman Conquest, William of Malmesbury’s account of Anselm, and the trilingual Eadwine Psalter, a manuscript produced at Canterbury.