IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 1737: The Meaning of Memories and Identities in Renaissance Florence

Thursday 5 July 2018, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Prato Consortium for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Organiser:Peter Francis Howard, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Moderator/Chair:John Henderson, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London / School of Philosophy, History & International Studies, Monash University
Paper 1737-a'I am very much indebted to this city': The Papal Residencies and Florentine Memory in Leonardo Bruni's Memoirs
(Language: English)
Luke Bancroft, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index terms: Language and Literature - Italian, Politics and Diplomacy, Rhetoric
Paper 1737-bRemembering Nuns: Miraculous Visions and the Narration of Spiritual Identity in Post-Tridentine Italy
(Language: English)
Rosa Martorana, School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index terms: Liturgy, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 1737-cThe Prudence of Memory: Remembering the Past in 15th-Century Florence
(Language: English)
Matthew Topp, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria / Centre for the Study of the Renaissance, University of Warwick, Coventry
Index terms: Education, Mentalities, Social History
Abstract

Linked to the Body in the City Project, this session examines the motivations for recording the past in Renaissance Florence during the 15th and 16th centuries. The focus is on exploring the ‘why of memory’, the mentalities and motivations that drive individuals and groups to record their past, in forms of remembering such as vernacular chronicles, diaries, and papal records. The three papers will analyse case studies of papal, mercantile, and female monastic communities, together offering a more nuanced understanding of the interactions between past and present in the formation of identity, beliefs, and narratives.