IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 201: Anglo-Saxon Riddles, II: Patterns and Relationships

Monday 2 July 2018, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:The Riddle Ages: An Anglo-Saxon Riddle Blog
Organisers:Megan Cavell, Department of English Literature, University of Birmingham
Jennifer Neville, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London
Moderator/Chair:Jennifer Neville, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London
Paper 201-aThe Vercelli Book and Enigmatic Reading
(Language: English)
Britt Mize, Department of English, Texas A&M University, College Station
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 201-bThe Awkward Ending of Riddles 21 and 58
(Language: English)
Linden Currie, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 201-cIsidore's Etymologiae, Riddles, and the Physiologus: Exploring a Triple Connection in Anglo-Saxon England
(Language: English)
Mercedes Salvador-Bello, Departamento de Literatura Inglesa y Norteamericana, Universidad de Sevilla
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Latin
Abstract

The papers in Session II explore intersections between texts, sources and traditions. Thus Mize will examine the Vercelli Book’s engagement with conditional revelation, celebrations of paradox, and scenes of intellectual confrontation that intersect the discursive mode of riddles; Currie will compare the aural and textual patterns of two specific riddles that share a solution, paying particular attention their endings; and Salvador-Bello will discuss how several Anglo-Saxon riddles on zoological topics were influenced by both Isidore of Seville’s Etymologiae and the Physiologus.