IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 209: Transcultural Approaches to the Bible: Exegesis and Historical Writing in the Medieval Worlds, II

Monday 2 July 2018, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Bible & Historiography in Transcultural Iberian Societies, 8th-12th Centuries, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / FWF Project
Organiser:Matthias Martin Tischler, Institut d'Estudis Medievals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Moderator/Chair:Stefan Donecker, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 209-aThe Chronicle of Sampiro, the Arabs, and the Bible: 11th-Century Christian-Iberian Strategies of Identifying the Cultural and Religious 'Other'
(Language: English)
Patrick Marschner, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Pagan Religions, Theology
Paper 209-bThe Armies of Gog and Magog?: Interpreting Nomadic Invasions as Apocalyptic Events in Western Christian, Eastern Christian, and Islamic Sources
(Language: English)
Nicholas E. Morton, School of Arts & Humanities, Nottingham Trent University
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Byzantine Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Paper 209-cHow to Fit the 'Livs' into Sacred History?: Identifying the Cultural 'Other' in the Chronicles of the Livonian Crusade
(Language: English)
Peter Fraundorfer, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Crusades, Historiography - Medieval, Pagan Religions
Abstract

The core idea behind this panel of three sessions is to bring together global scholarship working on the role of the Bible in the transcultural societies of the Euro-Mediterranean world and beyond in a strictly comparative and multidisciplinary manner. By focussing on the biblical background of perceptions of the religious and cultural ‘Self’ and ‘Other’ in the Mediterranean world and the Baltic Sea we will identify commonalities and differences of the ‘uses of the Bible’ in these worlds, and thus entangle and contrast studies on Bible manuscripts, their exegesis and their use for historical writing in the various medieval worlds.