IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 217: Change and Continuity in 10th Century Western Europe, I: The Resources of Central Authorities, The Identities of Local Leaders

Monday 2 July 2018, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action Project 'Central Authority & Local Strength in the Early Middle Ages: Comparing Social Complexity in Northern Iberia & Central Italy (8th-10th Centuries)'
Organiser:Igor Santos Salazar, Departamento de Geografía, Prehistoria y Arqueología, Universidad del País Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea
Moderator/Chair:Iñaki Martín Viso, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y Contemporánea, Universidad de Salamanca
Paper 217-aRulers and Resources in 10th-Century Iberia
(Language: English)
Robert Portass, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
Index terms: Economics - General, Social History
Paper 217-bTeofilatto or Teodora?: Women's Roles in the Construction of the Identity and Power of Roman Families
(Language: English)
Maddalena Betti, Dipartimento di Scienze Umane, Sociali e della Salute, Università di Cassino e del Lazio
Index terms: Gender Studies, Social History
Paper 217-c'Omnia disponebat ut soliti sunt modo Romani facere': Fiscal Lands, Private Wealth, and the Archbishop of Ravenna, 850-950
(Language: English)
Igor Santos Salazar, Departamento de Geografía, Prehistoria y Arqueología, Universidad del País Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea
Index terms: Economics - General, Social History
Abstract

Intending the Early Middle Ages as one of the most astonishing political and social laboratories in Europe’s history, the main goal of this session is the study of social complexity between the 9th and 10th centuries, comparing societies and political landscapes from two European macro-regions: Northern Iberia and Central Italy, in order to investigate social, economic and political complexities on a continental scale, with the main intention of interpreting ‘landscapes of social and political inequality’; to deepen the concepts of social and political inequality in the historical evolution of societies and powers, which must be always considered as processes in progress.