IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 224: Memory and Conquest: The Normans in the South

Monday 2 July 2018, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Department of History, Lancaster University
Organiser:John Aspinwall, Department of History, Lancaster University
Moderator/Chair:John Aspinwall, Department of History, Lancaster University
Paper 224-aThe Conquest of Sicily: From Memory to Written Record?
(Language: English)
Alex Metcalfe, Department of History, Lancaster University
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Language and Literature - Latin, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 224-bThe Norman Conquest of Palermo: Gates and the Tradition of Remembrance
(Language: English)
Theresa Jäckh, Transkulturelle Studien, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Index terms: Architecture - General, Historiography - Medieval, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 224-cMuslim Soldiers in Roger II's Armies
(Language: English)
Aron Kecskes, School of History, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Military History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The Norman Conquest of Sicily was a decisive moment in which the island of Sicily was drawn into the linguistic, cultural, and religious orbit of Western Europe. From here, the territorial consolidation of the Norman territories would see Norman dominion extended throughout the south Italian peninsula and into Malta and North Africa. In both the medieval and early-modern historiographical traditions, remembrances of these Norman conquests have often been framed by competing and overlapping religious, political, and cultural themes and devices. This session seeks to examine how medieval and early-modern historiographical narratives were constructed and by what means they sought to memorialise the Norman conquests.