IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 246: Remembering Jerusalem in Central Europe

Monday 2 July 2018, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Lenka Panušková, Institute of Art History, Czech Academy of Sciences, Praha
Moderator/Chair:Sara Offenberg, Department of the Arts, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva
Paper 246-aOld Czech Duke Ernst as a Quest for Surrogate Centre
(Language: English)
Matouš Jaluška, Institute of Czech Literature, Czech Academy of Sciences, Praha
Index terms: Crusades, Language and Literature - Slavic, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 246-bHow to Transfer the Holy Land Reality?: Pilgrim Accounts as Vehicles of Holy Land Transmission in the Late 15th Century
(Language: English)
Jaroslav Svátek, Centre for Medieval Studies, Univerzita Karlova, Praha
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Lay Piety, Religious Life
Paper 246-cHeavenly Jerusalem as a Diagram: Symbolics in Devotional Practices
(Language: English)
Lenka Panušková, Institute of Art History, Czech Academy of Sciences, Praha
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Liturgy, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Paper 246-dMemory of a Pilgrim: An Instrument of Urban Community Representation
(Language: English)
Vojtěch Bažant, Institute of Philosophy, Czech Academy of Sciences, Praha / Faculty of Arts, Univerzita Karlova, Praha
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Lay Piety, Local History
Abstract

Medieval Jerusalem as a site of eschatological expectation attracted memory in many forms. The proposed session will target the Holy City from two points of view. Firstly, the pilgrimage paradigm focuses on the aspects of spatial transfer, i.e. how the experienced reality of the Holy City / Holy Land(scape) helps to construct an imitation of the loca sancta in the pilgrim’s homeland. This automatically leads to the second paradigm of the visual representations of the Holy City in illuminated manuscripts. The diagrams or strictly geometrically constructed depictions of Jerusalem combining the motifs of heavenly as well as historical city are central in this context. Both the textual and visual images served the same purpose – to create mental images of the loca sancta so that the reader could experience an immersed meditation of Christ’s passion and derived salvific processes. The main focus of the session is the Central European material which is only occasionally reflected in the research dealing with the subject of Jerusalem.