IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 317: Change and Continuity in 10th-Century Western Europe, II: Archaeological Record and Historic Explanation

Monday 2 July 2018, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Organiser:Catarina Tente, Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Moderator/Chairs:Igor Santos Salazar, Departamento de Geografía, Prehistoria y Arqueología, Universidad del País Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea
Catarina Tente, Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Paper 317-aViking Elites in the 10th Century
(Language: English)
Frode Iversen, Kulturhistorisk museum, Universitetet i Oslo
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Archaeology - Sites, Geography and Settlement Studies, Social History
Paper 317-bAssembly Practices in 10th-Century England: Continuities and Innovations in the Landscape of Governance
(Language: English)
Stuart Brookes, Institute of Archaeology, University College London
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Archaeology - Sites, Mentalities, Social History
Paper 317-cArchaeological Markers of Social Statuses in 10th-Century Rural Settlements of Central-Northern Portugal
(Language: English)
Catarina Tente, Instituto de Estudos Medievais, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Geography and Settlement Studies, Social History
Abstract

This session follows another one title ‘Change and Continuity in 10th Century Western Europe, I: The Resources of Central Authorities – The Identities of Local Leaders.’ However this session will focus on the archaeological record of the 10th century and on the changes and continuities that are possible to be recognized by archaeologists. The session takes a transnational approach, with focus on Scandinavia (Norway), England, and Spain, that intends to put in order comparative approaches to investigate social, economic, and political complexities on a continental scale, with the main intention of interpreting ‘landscapes of social and political inequality.’