IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 324: The Chronicling of Conquest in the Norman South

Monday 2 July 2018, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Department of History, Lancaster University
Organiser:John Aspinwall, Department of History, Lancaster University
Moderator/Chair:Graham A. Loud, School of History, University of Leeds
Paper 324-a'From an ancient and corrupt hand': The Role of Memory in the Early Modern Manuscript Transmission of the Cronica Roberti Biscardi
(Language: English)
John Aspinwall, Department of History, Lancaster University
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 324-bThe Norman Conquest in the Historiography of Post-Norman Southern Italy
(Language: English)
Jakub Kujawiński, Institute of History, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań / Department of History, University of Helsinki
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 324-cContemporary Knowledge and Written History: Some Matters Regarding Alexander of Telese's 'History of King Roger'
(Language: English)
Markus Krumm, Historisches Seminar, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Abstract

In his history of the Norman Conquest of Sicily, Geoffrey Malaterra recorded how Roger I was ‘determined to record for later generations his victories’. An illustrative example of how memorialisation was often a prime motivation for those chronicling conquest, this tradition extended into the early-modern period. Here, such practices – often overtly tied to political, religious, and legal concerns – were formative influences on the production of the earliest volumes of Sicilian history. This session shall examine the main narrative sources for the Norman conquests and, in doing so, offer new insights into the role of memorialisation in the formation of the south Italian historiographical tradition.