IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 342: Fame: Patrons and Memories in Byzantium, III

Monday 2 July 2018, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Francisco Lopez-Santos Kornberger, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham
Jessica Varsallona, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham
Moderator/Chair:Daniel K. Reynolds, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham
Paper 342-aDiscreet Patrons: Hints of Komnenian Propaganda in the Continuation of Skylitzes
(Language: English)
Francisco Lopez-Santos Kornberger, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 342-bPulcheria: A 5th-Century Role Model for the 9th Century?
(Language: English)
Maria Vrij, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies / Barber Institute of Fine Arts, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Numismatics
Paper 342-cConsigned to the Flames of Oblivion: The Fate of Fire Temples in Late Antiquity
(Language: English)
Michael Burling, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Byzantine Studies, Social History
Abstract

The evocation of the past in Byzantium, far from being restricted to a purely individual sphere, constitutes a collective process. It was used by groups of individuals to shape their identities, explain the current state of affairs, and legitimise future policies. When memories from the past are evoked, ongoing narratives, symbols, and conventions are reshaped and acquire new meanings, often as a way to legitimise a vision of the world and to make a point about the present.The aim of this panel is to explore, through a multidisciplinary approach, how Byzantines perceived, transmitted, and used the past. The extent of the patrons’ agency is key to memory (re)formation of the Byzantine past.