IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 521: Allusion, Reference, and Memory in High Medieval Narratives, I

Tuesday 3 July 2018, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Centre for Research in Historiography & Historical Cultures / Department of History & Welsh History, Aberystwyth University
Organiser:Caitlin Naylor, Department of History & Welsh History, Aberystwyth University
Moderator/Chair:Björn Weiler, Department of History & Welsh History, Aberystwyth University
Paper 521-a'So that readers can know exactly what happened': The Role of Allusions as a Means of Authority and Memory in 12th-Century Origin Stories
(Language: English)
Kiri Kolt, Department of History & Welsh History, Aberystwyth University
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Comparative, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 521-bThe Gesta Stephani's Atypical Use of Intertextual Figures
(Language: English)
Tom Forster, Selwyn College, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Rhetoric
Paper 521-cWhy Did the British Burn Their Walking Dead?: Common Sense and Classical References in William of Newburgh's Historia Rerum Anglicarum
(Language: English)
Polina Ignatova, Department of History, Lancaster University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Mentalities, Religious Life, Social History
Abstract

Allusion, reference, and quotation were significant tools which medieval writers deployed in their texts. They could be used to enhance a reading, manipulated the reader to look beneath the surface of the text, and demonstrate the author’s skill and learning. However, for such use to be effective, both the author and audience had to be able to recognise and recall the original reference. This session seeks to explore the ways in which allusion was deployed across a broad geographical and chronological range of narratives. In particular, we will question what these allusions could illustrate concerning all forms of memory and memory practises.