IMC 2018: Sessions

Session 809: Exegesis and Polemics in Late Antiquity: The Letters (and Writings) of Jerome and Augustine

Tuesday 3 July 2018, 16.30-18.00

Organiser:Joseph Grabau, Faculty of Theology & Religious Studies, KU Leuven
Moderator/Chair:Przemysław Nehring, Katedra Filologii Klasycznej, Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika, Toruń
Paper 809-aPurging the Prophet's Lips: Jerome's Shifting Exegesis of Isaiah 6
(Language: English)
Angela Zielinski Kinney, Institut für Klassische Philologie, Mittel- und Neulatein, Universität Wien / Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies, University of Wales, Aberystwyth
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Rhetoric
Paper 809-bThe Use of Biblical Exempla in Augustine's Epistolary Polemic with the Donatists
(Language: English)
Rafał Toczko, Katedra Filologii Klasycznej, Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika, Toruń
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Rhetoric, Theology
Paper 809-cJohannine Citation in the Anti-Donatist and Anti-Pelagian Letters of Augustine
(Language: English)
Joseph Grabau, Faculty of Theology & Religious Studies, KU Leuven
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Rhetoric, Theology
Abstract

This session aims to present stylistic, theological reflections on primarily epistolary religious polemic. Our common interest lies in the use of biblical citations (or allusions) by the Latin Church fathers Jerome and Augustine, and their polemical use of biblical evidence in letters and other writings. How was the Bible, in addition to earlier patristic and even classical sources, called upon in the context of anti-Origenist, anti-Donatist, and anti-Pelagian controversies, for example? Presenters will address: (1) Origen’s interpretation of the seraphic vision of Isaiah as it appears in Jerome’s letters and other biblical commentaries; (2) the polemical reception of biblical exempla in Augustine’s anti-Donatist letters; and (3) mutually supporting use of John and Paul in the same epistolary corpus.