IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1015: Caucasian Connections, I: Re-Interpreting Boundaries in the Caucasus

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Department of History, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
Organiser:John Latham-Sprinkle, Department of History, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
Moderator/Chair:Hugh Kennedy, Department of the Languages & Cultures of the Near & Middle East, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
Paper 1015-a'Like those of Jerusalem who didn’t consider themselves Israelites': Political Economy, Elitedom, and Identity in Royal and Imperial Ani, c. 950-1064
(Language: English)
Nicholas Matheou, Oriental Institute, University of Oxford
Nicholas Matheou, Oriental Institute, University of Oxford
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Economics - Urban, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1015-b'The Power of the Foreign' and Medieval Caucasian Power Structures
(Language: English)
John Latham-Sprinkle, Department of History, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
John Latham-Sprinkle, Department of History, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
Index terms: Administration, Byzantine Studies, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1015-cThe Saga of the Stylites: The Appearance of Syriac Remote and Extreme Asceticism in Medieval Georgian Culture
(Language: English)
Erga Shneurson, Independent Scholar, Petach Tikva, Israel
Erga Shneurson, Independent Scholar, Petach Tikva, Israel
Index terms: Art History - Sculpture, Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The early medieval Caucasus was a region of interaction, dialogue, and conflict between the surrounding East Roman, Iranian, and Islamic Empires. Combined with the region’s strategic position, this gave rise to a unique political and literary culture. The papers in this panel will utilise newly-discovered archaeological evidence and new interpretations to expand our understanding of these political formations, and to challenge long-held assumptions about the culture of the frontiers. These include the importance of non-elites in the Armenian capital of Ani; the significance of access to the outside world in forming political legitimacy in the North Caucasus; and the importance of Syriac cults of stylites in the formation of Georgian political legitimacy.